Archives for the ‘hongkong’ Category

bliphany:bliphany:If this “finally” looks “terrifying enough” for you, there are countries that have…

bliphany:

bliphany:

If this “finally” looks “terrifying enough” for you, there are countries that have signed extradition treaties with China:

– Countries where the extradition treaties have been signed and become effective:

Russia, Bulgaria, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Mongolia, Romania, Thailand, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Cambodia, Republic of Korea, Peru, Lithuania, Laos, Kyrgyzstan, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Lesotho, Tunisia, Philippines, Spain, Pakistan, Portugal, Namibia, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Mexico, Angola, Brazil, Bosnia, France, Italy, Iran, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Barbados, Granada, Malaysia

– Countries where the extradition treaties have been signed and yet to become effective:

Argentina, Australia, Vietnam, Chile, Sri Lanka, Morocco, Congo, Belgium, Ecuador, Turkey, Kenya, Cyprus, Senegal, Mauritius, Zimbabwe, Panama, Uruguay, Armenia

Can you avoid all of these countries? How could you view this as merely an Asian issue now that you have this piece of information? Are we going to shut our mouth and let China do whatever it wants just because it has reached its hand this far/deep? Or maybe start to care about your government’s, political parties’ relationships with China from now on.

There’s a saying: you don’t want to choose destruction, so you choose humiliation. But after you choose humiliation, you still have to face destruction with humiliation.

ursik-l:

Some original texts from the newly passed National Security Law in Hong Kong for explanation: 

The Hong Kong security law applys to two kinds of people, HongKongers and non-HongKongers (aka the rest of all of us).

As long as you do anything the Chinese government considers hurting their feelings they can arrest you and block your connection to your resources once you set foot on Hong Kong’s land.

Even when you just want to transfer to another plane during your trip. Even when you just take a plane registered in Hong Kong.

Full English translation version can be found here

Therefore, if you, my fellow mutuals/followers, have ever participate or share any info on supporting Hong Kong independence as well as Uighur Muslim rights / Taiwan independence / any other human rights issues related to China:

DO NOT enter Hong Kong from now on. You will be in immediate danger once you step into.
Cancel your Hong Kong trips/transfer flights in the future if you have one, change your Hong Kong aircraft/shipment to any other whether you booked any.
This matters your safety.

China government really just pass this so-call law that apply on everyone on this planet. While living under such fearful and uncertain future, I cannot risk people live outside Hong Kong to be harm.

Its extremely gross that no one on this earth can be safe away from this new “law”, this could be the first time Westerners face the true danger that have been planted by China government since past.

Please look at us and mark our words. I don’t know where is our future, but we are still struggling hard for fighting rights, just like everyone else around the world right now. 

Stay safe. I will stay and so must you.

bliphany:

The Hong Kong security law applys to two kinds of people, HongKongers and non-HongKongers (aka the rest of all of us). The Hong Kong security law is activated in two kinds of places, Hong Kong and the rest of the world. As long as you do anything the Chinese government considers hurting their feelings (meaning you can’t say anything bad about them. you can’t discuss all the murders, rapping, police brutality, their anti-human acts) they can arrest you and block your connection to your resources once you set foot on Hong Kong’s land. Even when you just want to transfer to another plane during your trip. Even when you just take a plane registered in Hong Kong. The Chinese government has just passed a law that threatens all humans but most people especially western people still don’t care. Hong Kong’s protests have become just news or “nothing serious/important as what they’re facing now” because what western people are facing are always “the most important thing” until they get bitten from the back. And western governments still can’t find the nerves to say anything bad about Chinese government’s anti-human crime, even when after the two World War you’d thought they knew better than the rest of us. But no. All the decorating talking about human rights, progressive society, love is love, but when it comes to China nothing is more important than the mass market, cheap labor, all the trade benefits the Chinese government can give you (but then we all know how they can take that back as they please, or use that as leverage, the more intertwined your government let your present get tied to China, the more dependent your future becomes to the Chinese government) And now people have yet another “good” reasons to say positive things about China or at lease stay the fake, self-protecting neutral now that the Hong Kong security law can affect basically all of us. Not hurt enough. So people still have the thinking that we can do business with the Chinese government. To earn some benefit from them in this globalized capitalism/competitive world. So people shut their mouths and their hearts. But still believe they care about human rights. Such a weird thing.

bliphany:THANK YOU.ext-cosmos:Also, no one is speaking up about the concentration camps in Xinjiang….

bliphany:

THANK YOU.

ext-cosmos:

Also, no one is speaking up about the concentration camps in Xinjiang.

bliphany:

The Hong Kong security law applys to two kinds of people, HongKongers and non-HongKongers (aka the rest of all of us). The Hong Kong security law is activated in two kinds of places, Hong Kong and the rest of the world. As long as you do anything the Chinese government considers hurting their feelings (meaning you can’t say anything bad about them. you can’t discuss all the murders, rapping, police brutality, their anti-human acts) they can arrest you and block your connection to your resources once you set foot on Hong Kong’s land. Even when you just want to transfer to another plane during your trip. Even when you just take a plane registered in Hong Kong. The Chinese government has just passed a law that threatens all humans but most people especially western people still don’t care. Hong Kong’s protests have become just news or “nothing serious/important as what they’re facing now” because what western people are facing are always “the most important thing” until they get bitten from the back. And western governments still can’t find the nerves to say anything bad about Chinese government’s anti-human crime, even when after the two World War you’d thought they knew better than the rest of us. But no. All the decorating talking about human rights, progressive society, love is love, but when it comes to China nothing is more important than the mass market, cheap labor, all the trade benefits the Chinese government can give you (but then we all know how they can take that back as they please, or use that as leverage, the more intertwined your government let your present get tied to China, the more dependent your future becomes to the Chinese government) And now people have yet another “good” reasons to say positive things about China or at lease stay the fake, self-protecting neutral now that the Hong Kong security law can affect basically all of us. Not hurt enough. So people still have the thinking that we can do business with the Chinese government. To earn some benefit from them in this globalized capitalism/competitive world. So people shut their mouths and their hearts. But still believe they care about human rights. Such a weird thing.

Theoretically everyone in every corner on this planet is subject to this law. Please wake up to this madness, it’s not a local issue for Hongkongers only.

https://t.umblr.com/redirect?z=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fbethanyallenebr%2Fstatus%2F1278008352501530624%3Fs%3D21&t=MGViNDFiNjczMjYwMzU1MjU4YjZhNTNiOGZkMmYyMzgwZTJiM2E4NCxiZTY0M2Q5OWZmMTY4ZTAwMWQ3MjA3YjA4NzI4YzJiMmRhNDk3YmEx

EU response to latest China- Hong Kong crisis cowardly and unprincipled

EU response to latest China- Hong Kong crisis cowardly and unprincipled:

lovinghk:

(source: the irish times | 16 jun 2020)

… It is difficult to absorb the fact that Trump and Johnson are showing more leadership than Angela Merkel. It would be extremely sad and disappointing, as she approaches the end of her political career, if her much widely and deserved respected political legacy would be tainted by her failure to do what is right by Hong Kong.

Given the gravity of the threat posed to the rights and freedoms of Hong Kong citizens, it is imperative that the EU acts now to dissuade China from its current course of action. By September it may well be too late to do anything.

This week’s plenary session of the European Parliament will debate Hong Kong. MEP’s should pressurise the EU Commission and Council into postponing the Leipzig summit if China persists in imposing national security laws in Hong Kong. However, more is required. Despite the current economic threats that we are facing arising from the current pandemic crisis, the EU still remains the most powerful trading bloc in the world. We should use that considerable economic power and join with the US, the UK, Canada and Australia in warning China that we will impose political and economic sanctions on them.

If we fail to prevent China destroying Hong Kong’s autonomy, its next target will be Taiwan and Chinese interference in that country will have even more horrific consequences for global peace and security.

by John Cushnahan Former Fine Gael MEP And European Parliament Rapporteur for Hong Kong 1997-2004.

di-glossia: Hong Long Democrat convicted of assault after…

di-glossia:

Hong Long Democrat convicted of assault after using loudhailer near cop

gotham-ruaidh: hormonallyours: The 1989 Tiananmen Square…

gotham-ruaidh:

hormonallyours:

The 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, commonly known in mainland China as the June Fourth Incident (Chinese: 六四事件, liùsì shìjiàn), were student-led demonstrations in Beijing (the capital of the People’s Republic of China) for the establishment of basic human and press rights and against the Communist-led Chinese government in mid-1989. More broadly, it refers to the popular national movement inspired by the Beijing protests during that period, sometimes called the ‘89 Democracy Movement (Chinese: 八九民运, bājiǔ mínyùn). The protests were forcibly suppressed after Chinese Premier Li Peng declared martial law. In what became known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre, troops with assault rifles and tanks fired at the demonstrators trying to block the military’s advance towards Tiananmen Square. The crowds were stunned that the army was using live ammunition and reacted by hurling insults and projectiles. The troops used expanding bullets, prohibited by international law for use in warfare, which expand upon entering the body and create larger wounds. The number of civilian deaths was internally estimated by the Chinese government to be near or above 10,000.

The Communist Party of China forbids discussion of the Tiananmen Square protests and has taken measures to block or censor related information. Textbooks have little, if any, information about the protests. After the protests, officials banned controversial films and books, and shut down many newspapers. Within a year, 12% of all newspapers, 8% of publishing companies, 13% of social science periodicals and more than 150 films were banned or shut down. The government also announced it had seized 32 million contraband books and 2.4 million video and audio cassettes. Access to media and Internet resources on the subject are restricted or blocked by censors.

June 4, 1989-2020

We Hongkongers have commemorated Tiananmen Square Massacre for 31 years. This year we defy a police ban to gather, we stand up against CCP’s oppression in Hong Kong.

image

lovinghk: (credit: Ann Telnaes/The Washington Post) Cartoons:…

lovinghk:

(credit: Ann Telnaes/The Washington Post) 

Cartoons: The promise and reality of Hong Kong freedom

(source: the washington post | 27 may 2020)

AWSOM Powered