Archives for the Month of November, 2018

sirfrogsworth: (Sound is very much required on this…

sirfrogsworth:

(Sound is very much required on this one.)

Sometimes food is so darn tasty you gotta sing its praises.

AWOOOOO! 

ʷᵒᵒ

freundevonfreunden: Zizek Meets Abercrombie & Fitch The New…

freundevonfreunden:

Zizek Meets Abercrombie & Fitch

The New Yorker has rediscovered a 2003 Abercrombie & Fitch catalogue which reveals that the editorial team invited contemporary critical theorist Slavoj Zizek to comment on the photos they had prepared. 

Read the full story here

elfwreck:I’m sure it’s a wonderful tale of epic heroism and all…

elfwreck:

I’m sure it’s a wonderful tale of epic heroism and all that, but I’m just not certain I can see myself in this story.

millennial-review:

millennial-review:

laveritaswoman: nighean–donn: I wanted him in the bluntest way. I wanted his lips, his hands,…

laveritaswoman:

nighean–donn:

I wanted him in the bluntest way. I wanted his lips, his hands, his arms. I wanted him the way the ocean wants the shore, constantly reaching and running back.

I wanted her the way rain wants to fall, the way the sun wants to shine, the way words want to be read. I wanted her to infinity, to the millionth degree, no amount of rain could douse the fire I had in me for her.

J.C.

The beauty of “the female gaze” that made S1 OL a classic season has been slowly chipped away over the past two seasons and largely cast aside in S4. The female empowerment through open expression of one’s sexuality is gone, replaced by quick pecks, covering of bodies during what should have been openly passionate scenes, and fade to black “finishes.” The foundation of the entire OL book series is the timeless love story of Claire and Jamie, who, even into the autumn of their lives, defied prudish sexual barriers in their unfettered enjoyment in and appreciation of each other‘s bodies. Why the cable interpretation of OL has taken this unfortunate detour is anyone’s guess, but over the last three seasons and particularly in S4, the actors, writers, or producers have eliminated the very thing that made OL a highly praised standout series in S1. Perhaps S1 was deemed too risque; I choose to differ – pushing the boundaries was exactly what made OL unique. But swinging the pendulum in the opposite direction into a passionless vanilla miasma has made OL another run-of-the-mill series devoid of the chemistry and sensuality that made S1 so magical. If OL is to regain its magic, it needs to return to its once highly praised S1 roots.    

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