Archives for the Date February 19th, 2019

metapolitical: “Cowardice, cruelty, baseness and stupidity are not simply corporeal capacities or…

metapolitical:

“Cowardice, cruelty, baseness and stupidity are not simply corporeal capacities or traits of character or society; they are structures of thought as such.”

Gilles Deleuze, Difference & Repetition (151)

they are structures of thought as such

(via onetwofeb)

heteroglossia: I recognize that I love—you—by this: that you leave in me a wound that I do not want…

heteroglossia:

I recognize that I love—you—by this: that you leave in me a wound that I do not want to replace. (Jacques Derrida, The Post Card)

ecrituria: “Theory makes you desire mastery: you hope that theoretical reading will give you the…

ecrituria:

“Theory makes you desire mastery: you hope that theoretical reading will give you the concepts to organize and understand the phenomena that concern you. But theory makes mastery impossible, not only because there is always more to know, but, more specifically and more painfully, because theory is itself the questioning of presumed results and the assumptions on which they are based. The nature of theory is to undo, through a contesting of premisses and postulates, what you thought you knew, so the effects of theory are not predictable. You have not become master, but neither are you where you were before. You reflect on your reading in new ways. You have different questions to ask and a better sense of the implications of the questions you put to works you read.”

— Jonathan Culler, Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction

bergmans-ghost: “Above all, nobody, no body, no body proper has ever touched – with a hand or…

bergmans-ghost:

“Above all, nobody, no body, no body proper has ever touched – with a hand or through skin contact – something as abstract as a limit. Inversely, however, and that is the destiny of this figurality, all one ever does touch is a limit. To touch is to touch a limit, a surface, a border, an outline.”

— Jacques Derrida, On Touching, Jean-Luc Nancy

The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures–which permeate Western media–have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general–arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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heteroglossia: “Imagine that every time you wanted to get an apple from someone you had to go…

heteroglossia:

“Imagine that every time you wanted to get an apple from someone you had to go through the entire physical story–a shared memory of going to pick an apple from a tree. Imagine that you couldn’t sign or say “apple,” or gesture “want.” Painful enough, but what if you had no shared history on which the mime the actions? How would you communicate this need to a stranger? This is what generalizable signs make possible. This is the power of language. I can talk to people I don’t know. To then refuse the Other because of fear, how utterly ridiculous.”

— Ars Cogitanda, Footnote to Silence

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