Archives for the Date April 21st, 2019

philosophybits: “The most manifest sign of wisdom is a continual cheerfulness.” — Michel de…

philosophybits:

“The most manifest sign of wisdom is a continual cheerfulness.”

— Michel de Montaigne, Essais

The Most Basic of Harmonies: Music of the Spheres

figurationedellinvisible:

image


For physicists a particle has no independent existence. Rather, a particle is a set of interconnections of other things, that in turn reach out to connect with yet other things. The essential nature of matter relies not on objects, but on interconnections. Matter is solid because the probability patterns of those interconnections are very stable, and difficult to compress.

– If at the subatomic level there are no solid objects, then how is anything solid? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3590

– Bach!

– Recognizably! She is talking about how we tend to visualize subatomic particles as small billiard balls, or grains of sand—something solid, matter, finite. But really we should think of them more as interconnections, of probability relationships. “For physicists a particle has no independent existence. A particle is essentially a set of relations that reach outward to connect with other things.”

– It’s difficult for me to imagine it as other than points of matter

– It can’t be visualized, that’s precisely the problem—it can be described, with equations, but that is not the same thing.

“A particle is a set of interconnections of other things that in turn reach out to connect with still other things.“

“And what are those other things?”

“They are interconnections of yet other things, which also turn out to be interconnections. In atomic physics we never end up with any things, at all; the essential nature of matter, lies not in objects, but in interconnections.”

And then he plays a third, what does it mean? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3684

“The most basic of harmonies. The essence of the chord lies in the relationships [of the notes]. And the relationship between time and pitch, makes melody.”

– Bueno, music has three fundamental aspects, melody, rhythm and harmony. The first two are simple to understand, but the concept of harmony is more complex. Harmony is defined as the art of linking chords. What is a chord? The superposition, or vertical arrangement of three or more sounds.

– The relationships?

– Yes, but not any group of three sounds played together form a chord. Chords are constructed from third-party relationships. For example, if we take as fundamental note do, and we superimpose third ( do -re- mi -fa- sol)

We will have this:
Sol
Mi
Do

It is a C major chord, that is, there is a sound agreement between those three notes. The relationship of thirds is fundamental in Western music—at least since the period of the Renaissance, what we know is imperfect, variable or modal tunes. 

– Wow, I get it!

– Do you? This is where the fun part begins. You can have four sounds: 3 do and 1 mi, and that alone is enough for the set of those sounds to sound like a chord. It’s like a drop of ink spilled in water!

– Yeah! Well, it’s still a mystery :) But music can’t exist as single notes, the relationships bring it into being. And matter is not reducible to single “notes” either; there is nothing solid about it, on the atomic level.

– Western music, at least

– That’s amazing! Relationships make music, and relationships make matter—music of the spheres, musica universalis.

– Exactly! Even if in the piece there is no apparent harmony, for example, in a piece for solo flute, even in that case the melodic line executed is governed by laws; hierarchies that prioritize certain sounds over others, creating the effect of harmony.

– One inseparable web of relationships—like the Bach :) https://youtu.be/TNnz9ngsWcE

– Bach understood this better than anyone

– And we also have this intrinsic connection to music as human beings, through our bodies, because of singing?

– You can say that everything comes from there

Like the songbird of natural music :) And dance as a matrix where music and the body meet

– Music as movement, yes

Image: Ebenezer Sibly, Harmony of the World, 1806

The Most Basic of Harmonies: Music of the Spheres

figurationedellinvisible:

image


For physicists a particle has no independent existence. Rather, a particle is a set of interconnections of other things, that in turn reach out to connect with yet other things. The essential nature of matter relies not on objects, but on interconnections. Matter is solid because the probability patterns of those interconnections are very stable, and difficult to compress.

– If at the subatomic level there are no solid objects, then how is anything solid? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3590

– Bach!

– Recognizably! She is talking about how we tend to visualize subatomic particles as small billiard balls, or grains of sand—something solid, matter, finite. But really we should think of them more as interconnections, of probability relationships. “For physicists a particle has no independent existence. A particle is essentially a set of relations that reach outward to connect with other things.”

– It’s difficult for me to imagine it as other than points of matter

– It can’t be visualized, that’s precisely the problem—it can be described, with equations, but that is not the same thing.

“A particle is a set of interconnections of other things that in turn reach out to connect with still other things.“

“And what are those other things?”

“They are interconnections of yet other things, which also turn out to be interconnections. In atomic physics we never end up with any things, at all; the essential nature of matter, lies not in objects, but in interconnections.”

And then he plays a third, what does it mean? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3684

“The most basic of harmonies. The essence of the chord lies in the relationships [of the notes]. And the relationship between time and pitch, makes melody.”

– Bueno, music has three fundamental aspects, melody, rhythm and harmony. The first two are simple to understand, but the concept of harmony is more complex. Harmony is defined as the art of linking chords. What is a chord? The superposition, or vertical arrangement of three or more sounds.

– The relationships?

– Yes, but not any group of three sounds played together form a chord. Chords are constructed from third-party relationships. For example, if we take as fundamental note do, and we superimpose third ( do -re- mi -fa- sol)

We will have this:
Sol
Mi
Do

It is a C major chord, that is, there is a sound agreement between those three notes. The relationship of thirds is fundamental in Western music—at least since the period of the Renaissance, what we know is imperfect, variable or modal tunes. 

– Wow, I get it!

– Do you? This is where the fun part begins. You can have four sounds: 3 do and 1 mi, and that alone is enough for the set of those sounds to sound like a chord. It’s like a drop of ink spilled in water!

– Yeah! Well, it’s still a mystery :) But music can’t exist as single notes, the relationships bring it into being. And matter is not reducible to single “notes” either; there is nothing solid about it, on the atomic level.

– Western music, at least

– That’s amazing! Relationships make music, and relationships make matter—music of the spheres, musica universalis.

– Exactly! Even if in the piece there is no apparent harmony, for example, in a piece for solo flute, even in that case the melodic line executed is governed by laws; hierarchies that prioritize certain sounds over others, creating the effect of harmony.

– One inseparable web of relationships—like the Bach :) https://youtu.be/TNnz9ngsWcE

– Bach understood this better than anyone

– And we also have this intrinsic connection to music as human beings, through our bodies, because of singing?

– You can say that everything comes from there

Like the songbird of natural music :) And dance as a matrix where music and the body meet

– Music as movement, yes

Image: Ebenezer Sibly, Harmony of the World, 1806

The Most Basic of Harmonies: Music of the Spheres

figurationedellinvisible:

image


For physicists a particle has no independent existence. Rather, a particle is a set of interconnections of other things, that in turn reach out to connect with yet other things. The essential nature of matter relies not on objects, but on interconnections. Matter is solid because the probability patterns of those interconnections are very stable, and difficult to compress.

– If at the subatomic level there are no solid objects, then how is anything solid? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3590

– Bach!

– Recognizably! She is talking about how we tend to visualize subatomic particles as small billiard balls, or grains of sand—something solid, matter, finite. But really we should think of them more as interconnections, of probability relationships. “For physicists a particle has no independent existence. A particle is essentially a set of relations that reach outward to connect with other things.”

– It’s difficult for me to imagine it as other than points of matter

– It can’t be visualized, that’s precisely the problem—it can be described, with equations, but that is not the same thing.

“A particle is a set of interconnections of other things that in turn reach out to connect with still other things.“

“And what are those other things?”

“They are interconnections of yet other things, which also turn out to be interconnections. In atomic physics we never end up with any things, at all; the essential nature of matter, lies not in objects, but in interconnections.”

And then he plays a third, what does it mean? https://youtu.be/Uec1CX-6A38?t=3684

“The most basic of harmonies. The essence of the chord lies in the relationships [of the notes]. And the relationship between time and pitch, makes melody.”

– Bueno, music has three fundamental aspects, melody, rhythm and harmony. The first two are simple to understand, but the concept of harmony is more complex. Harmony is defined as the art of linking chords. What is a chord? The superposition, or vertical arrangement of three or more sounds.

– The relationships?

– Yes, but not any group of three sounds played together form a chord. Chords are constructed from third-party relationships. For example, if we take as fundamental note do, and we superimpose third ( do -re- mi -fa- sol)

We will have this:
Sol
Mi
Do

It is a C major chord, that is, there is a sound agreement between those three notes. The relationship of thirds is fundamental in Western music—at least since the period of the Renaissance, what we know is imperfect, variable or modal tunes. 

– Wow, I get it!

– Do you? This is where the fun part begins. You can have four sounds: 3 do and 1 mi, and that alone is enough for the set of those sounds to sound like a chord. It’s like a drop of ink spilled in water!

– Yeah! Well, it’s still a mystery :) But music can’t exist as single notes, the relationships bring it into being. And matter is not reducible to single “notes” either; there is nothing solid about it, on the atomic level.

– Western music, at least

– That’s amazing! Relationships make music, and relationships make matter—music of the spheres, musica universalis.

– Exactly! Even if in the piece there is no apparent harmony, for example, in a piece for solo flute, even in that case the melodic line executed is governed by laws; hierarchies that prioritize certain sounds over others, creating the effect of harmony.

– One inseparable web of relationships—like the Bach :) https://youtu.be/TNnz9ngsWcE

– Bach understood this better than anyone

– And we also have this intrinsic connection to music as human beings, through our bodies, because of singing?

– You can say that everything comes from there

Like the songbird of natural music :) And dance as a matrix where music and the body meet

– Music as movement, yes

Image: Ebenezer Sibly, Harmony of the World, 1806

thecrownnetflixuk: Everyone just wants you to be happy. -…

thecrownnetflixuk:

Everyone just wants you to be happy.

– Nobody gives a fig about my happiness.

Prince Philip (Matt Smith) & Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy) | ‘The Crown’ 1×10: Gloriana

thecrownnetflixuk: Everyone just wants you to be happy. -…

thecrownnetflixuk:

Everyone just wants you to be happy.

– Nobody gives a fig about my happiness.

Prince Philip (Matt Smith) & Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy) | ‘The Crown’ 1×10: Gloriana

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