Archives for the Date May 21st, 2019

“And never have I felt so deeply at one and the same time so detached from myself and so present in…”

“And never have I felt so deeply at one and the same time so detached from myself and so present in the world.”

Albert Camus (via thestrangerdaily)

“We all carry within us places of exile, our crimes, our ravages. Our task is not to unleash them on…”

“We all carry within us places of exile, our crimes, our ravages. Our task is not to unleash them on the world; it is to transform them in ourselves and others.”

Albert Camus (via thestrangerdaily)

Fanfiction – Something Beautiful

kalendraashtar:

Thank you to my dear @holdhertightandsayhername, for the help with deciding where to end this chapter. X

Part I, Part II , Part III, Part IV , Part V, Part VI, Part VII

Something Beautiful

Part VIII – A Rush of Water

For the next week we spent as
much time as humanly (and responsibly) possible, mostly outside the house to
avoid the temptation of our bodies in closeness. We went for munro bagging (“Not my best plan for making you
breathless”
, Jamie joked), for shrimp tacos at our favourite mexican
restaurant and for a live concert on the main square for the summer festival.
We grew even closer and more accustomed to deliberately touch and steal kisses
from each other, even if tentativeness still discovered us more often than
not.

Sunday found us laying on
the small beach close to our cottages, our bodies like two half-moons on the
sky of a dark blue quilt, lazy and luminescent under the effect of sunlight. I
was nestled on the crook of Jamie’s arm, wiggling my bare toes against the
sand, as Jamie read aloud “His Dark
Materials
”. His deep scottish accent, like molten caramel, oozed when he
was relaxed, his fathomless blue eyes hidden behind his Ray-Ban aviator sunglasses.

“Can ye move a little,
Sassenach?” He asked eventually, rubbing the spot between my shoulderblades
with his free hand. “My arm has gone numb and might die soon, if we stay like
this.”

I regretfully raised my
head and rolled on my belly, bracing myself against an elbow, while my other
hand still enveloped his waist. “Alright. How do you want me?”

The line of his mouth
narrowed in mischief, as he attempted to control a wicked smile; while is eyes
quickly glanced at my arse, particularly prominent in my current position and
majestically enhanced by my dark yoga pants. “I feel that is a somewhat tricky question.”

I playfully pinched the
skin between his clavicle and shoulder, wholeheartedly fighting the urge to
laugh. “Raise that mind of yours from the gutter, Duck, or I might just squash
you with my heavy cake-loving bum.”

“An honourable death.” He
grinned, placing the open book – marking the page he had just been reading –
close to his head. “Now how can I persuade you to go from vacant threats –
although terrible, mind – to
actions?”

Keep reading

aliciavikander: #forever mood

aliciavikander:
#forever mood

warmhealer: ‘If you are called to change your life by any…

warmhealer:

‘If you are called to change your life by any example, and your self responds–––you must change your life. And once you change, change again. 

Your next self, too, will be challenged by examples, to find a self still waiting beyond. Thus there is no perfection in perfectionism; the process of experience and correspondence never stops. If there could be any end in view, it would be only this: that the circle of things corresponding to you grow not wider, but infinitely wide, touching everything that exists.’ 

– Mark Greif, ‘The Concept of Experience’ in Against Everything

heteroglossia: “Put in simplest terms: how to combine a commitment to the universal recognition of…

heteroglossia:

“Put in simplest terms: how to combine a commitment to the universal recognition of others – whether it be a matter of ethical, cultural, or legal recognition – with a respect for the concrete particularism, difference, or asymmetry of others? How to dispel the figment of the “generalized other” that dominates substantialist versions of universalism in order to acknowledge particularized others? How to avoid the presumed ethnic, class, or gender bias that comes with imagining, let alone, recognizing the other? And, additionally, how not to rarefy the otherness of the other to such a degree that she is turned into an abstract alterity (slipping from the position of other, or autrui, back into the reified, objectified autre)? Lastly, and most crucially, in what way to redress the epistemic violence enacted by hegemonic Western discourses that silence or slight the subaltern other?”

— Beatrice Hanssen, “Ethics of the Other,” Critique of Violence: Between Postsructuralism and Critical Theory

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